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Full text of "Foreign crops and markets"

Historic, arcliived document 



Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



FOREIGN CROPS AND MARKETS 



ISSUED WEEKLY BY 

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

BUREAU OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
WASHINGTON. D. C. 



Vol. 34 March 22, 1937 No. 12 



LATE CABLES. . . 

India second estimate of 1937 wheat acreage placed at 
32,490,000 acres as against the second estimate for 1936 
revised to 33,331,000 acres and the final figure of 33,606,000 
acres. (Director of Statistics, Calcutta.) 

Tunis 1936 acreage and production reported as follows, 
with 1935 comparisons in parentheses: Bread wheat 331,000 
acres (321,000), 3,674,000 bushels (5,879,000); durum wheat 
890,000 acres (1,508,000), 4,409,000 bushels (11,023,000); 
barley 741,000 acres (1,532,000), 2,985,000 bushels 
(14,238,000); oats 62,000 acres (74,000), 689,000 bushels 
(1,240,000); corn 20,000 acres (44,000), 98,000 bushels 
(236,000). (International Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) 

Poland 1936 production reported as follows, with 1935 
. comparisons in parentheses: Corn 4,134,000 bushels (4,978,- 
000), flaxseed 2,834,000 (2,793,000), flax fiber 81,570,000 
pounds:- (87,811,000), hempseed 41,887,000 (45,070,000) hemp 
fiber 26,455,000 (26,681,000), tobacco 24,251,000 pounds 
(24,260,000). (International Institute of Agriculture, Rome.) 

Sydney, Australia, wool sales closed March 18, Com- 
pared with the evening of the series on March 15, prices for 
all well-grown descriptions were ruling in seller's favor; 
other sorts were firm. (Agricultural Attache, C. C. Taylor, 
London. ) 



158 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. 34, llo. 12 



GBjil'ES 

'The .guropcan vi'hegt situation 

The European Luport requirements of vrheat during 1957-38 v/ill he 
more dependent upon the outturn of the current domestic crops than has 
heen the case for several years, according to the Berlin office of the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The European hread-grain crop of 1936 
was the smallest since 1931; stocks on July 31, 1937, will he at the 
lowest level of many years; and there is a tendency evident in many 
countries toward "building up reserve stocks. 

Acreage and crop prospect s 

Some increase in the 1937 wheat acreage is indicated hy early 
estimates, cut it prohahly will be small in spite of the fact that 
the 1936 acreage was belov; that of the 3 preceding years. In many 
ccontries, adverse veather conditions were experienced during the fall 
sowing seasons of ooth 1935 and 1936. Spring seedings may show some 
expansion this j^ear, but the total European wheat e.creage is not ex- 
pected to exceed 76,600,000 acres, which is not greatly different from 
the 1930-1934 average of 76,107,000 acres. The condition of the v;inter 
crop is genere^lly less satisfactory than at this time last year. Tfith 
favorahle weather during the spring and summer, good yields might he 
obtained, hut some concern has alrea.dy heen expressed over crop pros- 
pects. Conditions in the Danuhe Basin are considered good, hut another . 
record crop is not anticipated. Prospects are generally varied in the 
Mediterraneeii Basin and quite uncertain in Spain. 'Weather conditions 
have heen rather unfavorahle in France, hut in Italy and the British 
Isles the crop has made a good start. 

Market and trade situation 

Reduced wheat crops in overseas exp'Orting countries and active 
European demand during recent months resulted in the highest level of 
world prices since 1929. l\Iet imports during 1936-57 hy S-'uropean co^un- 
tries are expected to total about. 460,000,000 bushels, or around 
120,000,000 hushels more than imports in 1935-56. The increase in the 
volume of European needs has heen met to a large extent this saason hy 
exports from the record crop of the Danube Basin. Czechoslovalcia and 
Poland have also heen important sources of supply. Overseas countries, 
therefore, have not benefited as much as might have heen expected. 
Italy has heen an important importer, and Germany and Prance have siz- 
ahle deficits hut have postponed importation in the hope of favorable 
crops in 1957. Spain has heen a recent purchaser sjid may become more 
important as the season advances. The desire to huild up stocks ap- 
parent in several countries, especially in the United Kingdom, may he 
a potential factor in strengthening the world market for some time to 
come. 



March 22, 1937 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



159 



The oriental v/ heat si tuation 

The 1937 oriental wheat crop is expected to he froro 10 to 25 per- 
cent smaller than that of 1936, according to the Shanghai office of the 
Bureau of Agricultural Economics. The 1936 production of China, as re- 
ported "by the International Institute of Agriculture, and the official 
estimates for Japan and Manchuria total ahout 926,000,000 hushels. In- 
creases may take place this season in Japan and Manchuria., but they will 
he more than offset by the expected reduction in China, which accounts 
for over 90 percent of the oriental crop. Dry weather not only curtailed 
Chinese sowings but also retarded the development of the crop to some 
extent. 

Because of the record rice and other food crops harvested last 
year, wheat and flour I'equirements for 1936-37 are estimated at only 
about 15,600,000 bushels as compared with 34,200,000 bushels in 1935-36. 
Imports during July-January 1936-37 were largely from Canada and 
Australia. 

China 

Rainfall in China from September 1936 through January 1937 was 
generally below average. Seeding opera.tions were especially handicapped 
in the Ya.ngtze Va^lley and in North China, where the plants were also 
damaged by later drought conditions. The 1937 crop is therefore ex- 
pected to be ma,terially reduced. Import requirements in 1937-38 are 
likely to be above the 2,750,000 bushels estimated for the 1936-37 sea- 
son. IJo interest is being shown at the present time in foreign whea.t, 
and in spite of higher world prices, wheat and flour prices at Shanghai 
declined during the week ended March 12. The demand for flour has been 
recently curtailed, and milling requirements have been filled by arrivals 
of domestic wheat. Australian wheat v/as nominally quoted in Shanghai 
on March 11 at $1.32 per bushel, while future prices of domestic wheat 
ranged from $1.05 for March delivery to 85 cents for new-crop v/heat to 
be delivered in June. Domestic flour was $1.17 per bag of 49 pounds 
for March delivery and $1.03 for June delivery. Australian flour, c.i.f. 
Hong Kong, was $5.26 per barrel of 19 6 pounds. 

Japan 

The area sown to wheat in Japan for the 1937 crop is unofficially 
reported to be from 10 to 15 percent larger than that sown for 1936. 
Since weather conditions in January and February were rather unfavorable, 
little if any increase is expected in the 1937 crop. Estimated imports 
for 1936-37 are placed at 9,921,000 bushels. Actual imports of wheat 
during July-January 1936-37 totaled 4,517,000 bushels as against 7,606,000 
bushels imported in the corresponding months of 1935-36. Exports of 



160 



Vol. 34, Ko. 



flour amounted to only 649,000 barrels as against 1,496,000 "barrels 
exported in July-January 1935-36, and the total for the year it not 
expected to exceed 1,350,000 harrels, or aoout 60 percent of 1935-36 
exports . 

Manchuria 



A suDstartial erxpansion in the wheat acreage of Manchuria is 
expected in 1937 if normal conditions are experienced during the 
spring months. Average yields would resu-lt in a larger crop than 
that ohtained in 1936, when yields were below average. Milling facil- 
ities in Manchuria are being increased and improved, so that the 1936-37 
demand for flour has been met largely by domestic production. ?lour 
imports from July 1 to December 31 amounted to only 880,000 barrels in 
1936 as against 2,009,000 barrels in 19 35. The total for the market- 
ing year is ostim.ated at about 2,400,000 barrels as compared with 
3,142,000 barrels imported in 1935-36. 



COTTON 



Chinese imports of American cotto n decline 



American raw cotton imports into China during the period October- 
January 1935-37 ainounted to 4,291 bales as against 19,064 bales dur- 
ing a similar 1935-36 period, according to Agricultural Commissioner 
Owen L. DaT/son, at Shanghai. Tote^l foreign cotton imports during the 
first 4 months of the present season totaled 31,171 bales, or only 
1,326 bodies less than in Oct ober- Jjtnaary 1936. Despite the shortage 
of an adeOj^uate supply of cotton for higher counts, Chinese commitments 
for foreign cotton are very small, amounting to 2,000 bales American, 
6,000 African, 3,000 Indian, and 4,000 bales Egyptian. 



CHIMA: Imports of raw cotton in January 1936, with comparisons 

(in bales of 500 pounds) 



Gro^^th 


: Janu-a.ry 


October- 


-January 


; 1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 




■ Bales 


Bales 


Bales 


Bales 






2,234 


19,064 


4,291 






1,347 


4,261 


3,373 




. . ; 3,417 


4,078 


8,891 


10 , 254 






1,754 


281 


13,253 


Total 


. ; 10,983 


9,413 


: 32,497 


31,171 



. Prices of domestic cotton have risen slightly, but they have not 
advanced as much as those of foreign staple, especially American. Mills 



March 22, 1957 



Foreign Crops end M8.rkets 



161 



have iDeen working at near capacity, r^nd present prospects indicate that 
mill consumption will reach 2,500,000 hales in the 1936-37 crop year. 

In view of the prevailing favorahle cotton prices, there will he 
a tendency to increase the cotton acreage this spring, although on 
account of dry soil conditions it is still uncertain vmether this can he 
carried out in ITorth China. The expected increase in the Yangtze 
Valley will insure an acreage at least equal to that of last year. 

CHINA: Stocks in Shanghai puhlic warehouses, February 29, 1937, 

with comparisons 



Grov/th 


1936 


1937 


February 29 


January 31 


February 28 




Bales 


Bales 


Bales 




2,200 


1,000 


' a/ 




400 


a/ 






84,562 


144,000 


118,000 




1,832 


1,000 


2,000 






1.000 


2,000 




88,994 


147,000 


122,000 



a/ Negligible. 



CHINA: Price per pound of specified grades of cotton and yarn at 
Shanghai, March 11, 1937, with comparisons 



Growth 


; Date of delivery 


February 5, 1937 


March 11, 1937 






Cent s 


Cents 


Domestic cotton.. 


.Current month 


11.48 


11.67 


Domestic cotton. . 


.2 months forward 


11.70 


11.97 


American middling 


immediate shipment 


17.16 


18.44 




.■Jmmedia.te shipment 


12.71 


13.34 




,S months forv/ard 


17.04 


16.71 



FRUITS, VFGj^TiiBLES, JiIJD HUTS 
Exports of Cuben vegetables declined in February 



The volume of exports of fresh vegetables from Cuba to the United 
States declined in February as compared with those of the preceding month 
and February a year ago, as reported by Harold S. Tewell, American Consul 
at Habana. Tote.l shipments in February amounted to 7,698 short tons again 
9,311 tons in February 1936. Tomatoes comprised the bulk of the shipments 



162 



foreign Grcps ahd Markets 



Vol. 34, Ho. 12 



Shipments of tomatoes during Mai-ch are expected to "be somewhat 
larger than the 167,383 liogs exported in March of 1936. Although sup- 
plies of lima teans are plentiful, the quality is poor and shipments 
during Llarch are not expected to exceed the 14,289 hampers shipped in 
March last year. A decline in production and the scarcity of high qual- 
ity stock su-itahle for export have affected eggplant shipments and con- 
sequently no increase in shipments of that vegeta^ble is anticipated. 
A pour demand for peppers has restricted exports to the United States., 
and exports will probahly be light for the balance of the season. 



CUBA: Exports of winter vegetables to the United States, 
November 1 to Eebruair/ 28, 1934-35 to 1936-37 



Vegetable 


1934-35 


1935-36 


1936*37 




1,000 pounds 


1 , 000 pounds 


1 , 000 pounds 


Tomatoes . 


38,711 


44,394 


44,792 


Eggplant 


2,220 


4 , 940 


4,487 


Peppers. 


2,084 


3,863 


2,406 


Okra 


783 


1,026 


1,138 


Lima bjans 


2,971 


6,003 


4,628 


Cucumb .rs 


1 , 594 


2,237 


2,629 


Potatoes 


609 


827 


1,139 


Total 


48,972 


63 , 290 


61,219 



Compiled by Harold S. Tewell, American Consul at Habana. 
sent gross weights. 



Figures repre- 



LIVESTOCIC, MEATS, AKD TOOL 



B ritish cured- po rk qu ota extended at existing rate 

The British Board, of Trade announces that imports of cured pork 
from non-Empire countries will be permitted at the existing rate (ap- 
proximately 11,508,000 pounds per week) to the end of June. In vievr of 
the fact that during the May 1 - August 31 period last year the quota 
rate (11,557,000 pounds per week) was higher than duririg any other period 
in 1936, the new rate for May-June 1937 represents a reduction of 0.5 per- 
cent from that of the saTie months in 1936. Quota figures for the first 
half of 1937, however, at approximately 297,590,000 pounds, represent a 
2.4— percent increase compared with corresponding 1935 figures of 290,672,00( 
pounds. The United States quota represents as usual 8.1 percent of the 
total and for the second qiiarter of 1937 will a-nount to nearly 12,119,000 
pounds. 

Sydney wool sales open strong 

The current wool sales opened at Sydney, Australia, on_ March 15 
with prices from 5 to 7.5 percent higher than at the close of the preceding 



March 22, 1S37 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



163 



series on February 25, according to c^.bled advices from Agricultural Attache 
C. G. Taylor at London, There was a good selection of offerings, with keen, 
general competition in evidence from Yorkshire, Japan, Continental Europe, 
and the United States, 

Devislopments at the Sydney sales substantiate tendencies toward higher 
prices noted earlier in the month by British observers. Yorkshire buyers 
have been a.ctive in all primary markets since March 1, according to Consul 
E. E. Evans at Bradford. The stronger tone also was prevalent in the London 
wool sales of March 2 - 12. The recent firmness in raw materials prices has 
removed a considerable amount of uncertainty with respect to future trends, 
and spinners have been receiving larger orders for yarn. The piece goods 
trade also continued to improve as raw wool prices hardened. Most manufa-C- 
turers are reported as well occupied, with some delay being experienced in 
deliveries. 



l;i/HBAT, INCLUDING FLOUR: Shipments from principal exporting countries 



as given by current trade sourc es, 1934-35 to 193ri-37 





Total 


Shipments 1937 


Shipments 


Country 


shipments 


week ended 




July 1... 


rJviarch .13 


1934-351935-36 


Feb. 27 


Mar . 6 










1,000 : 1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 


1,000 




bushels ; bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


bushels 


North America a/ 


162,832: 219,688 


3,312 


2,184 


1,472 


139,976 


175,134 


Canada , 










4 markets b/. . 


176,059:246,199 


218 


446 


612 


187,635 


162,620 


United States* c / 


31,532: 15,930 


160 


194 


168 


5,186 


6,435 




186,228; 77,384 


8,760 


9,090 


7,239 


62 , 304 


108,041 


Australia 


111,628:110,060 


3,432 


3, 739 


2,516 


79,916 


64,803 


U.S. S.R 


1,672; 30,224 


0 


0 


0 


27,808 


88 


Danube 












and Bulgaria d/ 4,104; 8,216 


232 


136 


192 


7.904 


■46,992 


British India. . . , 


c/2,318'c/2,529 


0 


80 


72 


256 


7.936 




458,782:448,101 








318.154 


402,994 


Total European 










L/ 


1/ 


shipments a/. . j 387, 752:355,032 


; 13,040 






240,088 


305 , 272 


Total ex-Europeari ; 










IT 


shipments a/ . , ;147, 938 • 133 . 528 


' 3,096 






86,888 


90,824 



Compiled from official and tra-de sources, a/ Broomhall's Corn Trade News. 

Fort William, Port Arthur, Vancouver, Prince Rupert, and Nsv7 Westminister, 
c/ Official. d/ Black Sea shipments only, e/ Total of trade figures in- 
cludes North America as reported by Broomhall. f/ To February 27. 



164 Foreign Crops r-sid. Markets ' Vol. 24, No. 12 



'vfflEAT: Closing Saturday prices of kay futures 



Date 


1 Chi 


cago 


; Kansa 


s City 


, Minneapolis 


: Vtfinnixoeg a/ 


' Liverpool a 


,/ Buenos 
;__._.Alres 'b/' 




: 1936 


J^937._ 


;1936 


.1957 


'1935 


J-93:-L 


Uy36,_ 


; 1937 


• 1936 


1937 


; 1936 


_]^37._ 


High c/. . . 


;' Cents 


' Cents 


: Cents 


; Cents. 


. Cent s 


: Cents 


' Cents 


• Cents 


] Cents 


i Cents 


] Cents 


Cents 


: 103 


; 138 


■ 102 


; ioO 


. 112 


144 


: 69 


; 132 


: 96 


:"l34 


:d/ 94 


d/llO 


Low c/.... 


; 9-7 


: 126 


i 94 


*: 120 


. 106 


; 132 


: 83 


. 118 


; 69 


; 119 


.'d/ 91 


d/ 94 


J'e D . 20 . . . 


: 99 


: 133 


: 97 


: 124 


108 


j 140 


' 84 


• 120 


: 90 


; 124 


: 91 


100 


27. . . 


; 100 


: 132 


; 98 


: 123 ■ 


109 


: 138 


84 


125 


90 


; 125 


: 91 


101 


Mar. 6. . . 


; 100 


; 136 


S7 


: 127 


108 


■ 140 


85 


129 


: 91 


i 131 


■ 91 


104 


13. . . 


: 100 


■ 134 


! 98 


■ 126 


108 


• 139 


85 


130 


93 


; 133 


"e/ 92 


108 


a/ Conversions at noon 


bu^'ing rate 


of exchange 


b/ Prices 


are of day previous to 


other prices. c/ Januj 


;-.ry 1 to dato. d/ 


March 


and May futures. 


e/ June futures. 




wKEAT: V/eekly weighted average cash price at 


stated 


marke t s 






All classes 


Ho 


. 2 


No . 


1 


No. 2 


Hard 


No. 


2 


'Western 


Week ; 


and grades 


Hard V/inter 


Dk.N. Spring 


Aaber 


Durum 


Ked Winter 


fcite 


ended ; 


six markets 


Kansas City 


Minnef 


polls 


luinneapolis 


St. Louis 


Seattle a/ 




1936 . 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


193 b 


1937 


1956 


1937 


1936 


1937 


High W. , . i 


Cents'; 


C.ents 


Cents| 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents" 


Cents 


Cents 


108 


150"''. 


118 : 


144' _ 


155 ; 


lo7 


123 


206 


111 ; 


145 : 


90 


117 


Low 'b / , . . .'■ 


100 : 


135 j 


107 i 


153 ; 


125 ; 


152 


115 


154 • 


106 : 


137 : 


65 


110 


Fe "b . 20 ... ; 


106 : 


140 : 


111 ; 


136 : 


132 '. 


165 




178 ; 


108 ; 


143 : 


85 . 


116 


27..,: 


107 : 


135 : 


113 : 


133 ■ 


126 ; 


156 


118 


158 j 


111 : 


139 ; 


87 : 


112 


kar . 6 . . . ; 


104 ; 


139 : 


108 : 


138 ■ 


130 : 


152 ; 


123 • 


154 i 


110 ; 


142 \ 


83 : 


113 


13. .. ; 


100 1 


139 : 


109 :" 


138 ■ 


125 ; 


154 ; 


115 ' 


206 ; 


108 •; 


142 ; 


88 ; 





a/ Yii'eekly average of daily cash quotations, basis No. 1 sacked, b/ January 1, to 
date . 



MANCHURIA: Exports of soybeans and soybean produces, 
October - February, 1955-36 and 193c-37 



Product 


Exports October - February 


Surplus remaining 
on February 28 


19:^5-:^ 6 


IS 0 6- 37 


1936 


1937 


Beans 

Oil 

Bean cake a,nd meal. 


Short tons 


Short tons 


Short tons 


Short tons 


1,022,000 
.4 43,700 
462,000 


1,184,000 
33,400 
433,000 


1,026,000 
39,000 
504,000 


1,407,000 
49 , 300 
614 , 000 



American Consulate, Dairen. 



March 22, 1937 Foreign Crops and Markets 165 



FEED GHAISS AK^D HYE: T/eekly avera.ge price per bushel of corn, rye, 
oats, and "barley at lending markets— 





Corn 


Hye 


Oats 


Barley 


T/eek 


Chicago 


3ue no s 


Aires 


Minneapolis 


Chicago 


Minneapolis 


i\io 


. 3 


Futures 


Futures 


No. 


2 




3 


No 




ended 


Yellow 












yh: 


Lte 








1936 


1937 


1936 


1937 


1935 


1937 


1935 


1937 


1956 ; 


19 37 


1936 


1937 




Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Cents 


Cents 


Ce nt s 


Cents 


Ce nt s 


Cents! 


Cents 


Cent s 


Cents 


Hi gh b / . . 


62 


113 


61 


111 


4i 


51 


58 


117 


31 : 


55 


74 


137 


Low b7- • . 


60 


108 


60 


105 


39 


48 


53 


106 


28 : 


49 


58 


117 








May 


May " 


May 


May 














Feb . 13 . . 


51 


113 


61 


110 


c/39 


50 


57 


117 


30 : 


54 


63 


137 


20. . 


62 


111 


61 


108 


39 


50 


56 


113 


31 : 


52 


58 


133 


27. . 


61 


109 


61 


106 


40 


48 


56 


106 


30 : 


49 


74 


127 


Mar . 6 , , 


62 


112 


61 


108 


41 


50 


55 


106 


29 i 


49 


69 


124 


13. . 


61 


113 


61 


109 


41 


51 


■53 


107 


23 : 


50 


68 


117 



a/ Cash prices are weighted averages of reported sales; future prices are simple 
averages of daily quotations, b/ For period January 1 to latest date shown. 
c/ April delivery. 



FEED GRAIKS: Movement from principal exporting countries 



Commodity 
and 
country 


Exports 
for year 


Shipments 1937, 
week ended a/ 


Exports as far 
as reported 


1934-35 


1935-36 


Feb. 27 


Mar. 6 


Mar. 13 


July 1 
to 


1935-36 
b/ 


1936-37 
h/ • 


BABLEY, EXPORTS: c/ 
United States. . . 

Danube & U.S. S.H. 

OATS, EXPORTS: c/ 
United States. . . 

Danube & U.S.S.H. 


1,000 
'bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


1 , 000 
bushels 


Mar. 13 
Feb. 28 
Feb. 27 
Mar. 13 


1,000 
bushels 


1,000 
bushels 


4,050 
14,453 
20,739 
11,250 


9,886 
6,882 
9,468 
37,375 


0 

1,137 

132 


119 

190 


181 
25 


7,875 
4,570 
4,112 
39,516 


4,238 
16,496 
10,200 
23,096 


50 , 49 2 


63,611 










56,074 


54 , 030 


1,147 
17,407 
43,753 

8,444 


1 , 429 
14,892 
9,790 
2,847 


0 

999 
0 


0 

661 

0 


1 

1,481 

0 


Mar. 13 
Feb, 28 
Mar. 13 
Mar. 13 


783 
11,204 
7,734 
1,390 


516 
8,495 
15,476 
810 


70,751 


28 , 958 










21,111 


25, 297 


0031^, EXPORTS: d/ 
United States. . . 
Danube & U.S.S.R, 

South Africa 


880 
14,939 
256,143 
21,862 


885 
14,984 
307,638 
8,910 


6 

595 
7,945 
25 


2 

1,301 
6,945 
51 


2 

265 
5,256 

34 


Nov.l to, 
Mar. 13 
Mar. 13 
Mar. 13 
Mar, 13 


190 
3,466 
110,907 
5,348 


132 

11,225 
157,810 
2,532 


293,844 


332,417 










119,911 


171.599 


United States 


41,141 


24,521 








Jan, 31 


5,612 


16,103 



Compiled from official and trade sources. a/ The weeks shown in these columns are 
nearest to the date shown, b/ Preliminary, c/ Year beginning July 1. d/ Year 
beginning November 1. 



166 



Foreign Crops and Markets 



Vol. ^A, Fo. 12 



Inaex 



Page 



Late caoles 157 



Barley, area axid. production, 

Tunis, 1935,1936 157 

Corn: 

Area, Tunis, 1935,1936 157 

production: 

Poland, 1935,1936 157 

Tunis, 1935,1936 157 

Cotton: 

Imports, China, 

January 1936, 1937 160 

Prices, Snangnai, March 11, 1937 161 
Stocks, Shanghai, ?elD. 28, 1937. 161 
Flax liber, production, 

Poland, 1935,1936 157 

Flaxseed, production, Poland, 

1935,1936 157 

Grains (feed): 

Movement, principal countries, 

March 13^, 1937^. 165 

Prices, principal markets, 

March 13, 1937 165 

Hemp fiber, loroduction, Poland, 

1935,1936/. 157 

Hempseed, production, Poland, 

1935,1936 157 

Oats, area and production, 

Tunis, 1935,1936 157 



Page 



Pork, inport quota extension, . " 

U. K., May- June 1937 162 

Eye, prices, U. S. , March 13, 1937 165 
soybeans: 

Pxportable surplus, Manchuria, 

Feb. 28, 1937 164 

Exports, M-'^nchuria, October- 
February, 1936-37 164 

Tobacco, production, Poland, 

1935,1936 157 



Vegetables, exports to U.S., Cuba, 

Nov, 1-Feb. 26, 1936-37 162 

Wheat : 
Area: 

Eurooe, 1937 158 

India, 1936,1937 157 

Tunis, 1935, 1936 157 

Prices: 

Cnina, March 11, 1937 159 

Specified markets, 

March 13, 1937 164 

Production, Tunis, 1935,1936 157 

Snipments, principal countries, 

Marcn 13," 1937/. 163 

Situation: 

Euroioe, February 1937 158 

Orient, February 1937 159 

Wool, sales, Sydney, Australia, 

March 15-18, 1937 157,162